Analyst analysis

Just sent a DM on Twitter to a group of like-minded soccer moaners and groaners. It was regarding one of the colour commentators on a Canadian broadcast of a game.

“XXXXX makes Capt Obvious look like an enigma.”

With Jason de Vos’ decision to leave TSN and take a position with the CSA, there was been a handful of suitors pushed in front of the camera in the hopes that one will bring the quality insight he was known for. The bar was raised and while it’s maybe unfair to expect the same standards of those new to the craft it’s still important that those selecting and those selected aspire to a high level of analysis rather than falling back on generic banter and passing off the obvious as expert analysis.

Current production values seem to favour candidates who were former players, have an accent relatable to the masses and/or a degree of confidence that is not aligned with their  current chops as an analyst. So far I remain underwhelmed.

Here’s a better recipe.

Take someone with a keen eye for the telling detail, with the ability to relate it economically and clearly. Viewers don’t need to be clubbed with gegenpressing details for three minutes amid a digital swirl of lines and circles on a monitor. They need relevance delivered coherently with the occasional bit of humour that oscillates between cutting and self deprecating.

Focus on specifically why goals were either created or conceded without incessant cliches. Simply regurgitating what the play by play guy has said with no embellishment beyond whiter teeth and a hipper haircut does not pass for analysis.

Yes, there will always be the realities of TV production values and the concomitant necessity of putting someone in front of the camera that can string words together smoothly while not being physically repulsive. But really it has to be both function and form and when in doubt favour the former over the latter.

 

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